Discerning Between Useful And Useless Parenting Advice

Article by Mary Loewen

Parenting advice is all around us every day, from experts to novices, from our parents to fellow parents that we meet at the sporting event. We are constantly bombarded by some form advice. Simply giving parenting advice is uncomplicated because everyone has had some kind of know-how in the topic. There are novel parenting tips, survival guides, and lists of what to do and not to do that are being provided to parents every day of the week.

Information must be Sorted

With the wealth of information at our disposal, it is often rather puzzling as far as separating out what works and what does not. When do parents follow the advice given in the information and when do they resort to common sense? Do those so-called experts have any practical parenting experience and do they know what it is like to be a parent in a real home?

Parents are well advised to take a look at RPM3, which is a straightforward approach to parenting. It has been developed over a period of 30 years by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). They have included expert, parents, and children in their studies and in the process collected statistics and recognized folklore as well as proven ideas to come up with the RPM3.

RPM3 is a very useful guide to sort parenting advice into what is useful and what is not. The RPM3 guidelines are not based on myths or unproven theories formulated for the sake of selling books. They are based on 30 years of NICHD research and helps parents determine what works in the real home life.

The RPM3 Method

RPM3 is an abbreviation of Responding, Preventing, Monitoring, Mentoring, and Modeling. Its goal is to teach parents how to properly respond to a child’s behavior. It also advises parents on how to get to the root of ugly behavior and how to correct that behavior. The guidelines also teach how to examine the child’s interaction with his surroundings and how to mentor the child in responding to his environment in a socially acceptable manner. Furthermore, the guidelines also attempt to model the parent’s behavior so that the parent provides a positive and consistent example that the child can follow.

On top of the above, there is also other information available that addresses areas such as proper child nutrition, safety and security, common problems that parents experience, as well as what to look forward to at the pediatrician.

Parents are often in need of guidance on how to properly deal with common issues such as sibling rivalry, potty training, getting the child to sleep at night as well as managing behavior problems and temper tantrums.

The world is full of highly competent gurus that specialize in such subjects and who are most suitable as sources of parenting information for all types of difficult parenting issues. Using a combination of RPM3 guidelines and advice from recognized and respected experts will help parents sort the useful information from the useless information.

Mary Loewen writes parenting advice for ParentPlaza.com, a site dedicated to helping parents with their solemn task of raising their children.

 

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